Articles

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Notes for a workshop delivered at the Second Aotearoa Solution Focused Practice Conference, Christchurch, March 15th 2017

A competency mechanism. (Not in refereed journal). 2017.-A review of the NZ HPCA Act as it might concern NZ Counsellors, suggesting that they adopt routine outcome monitoring as a mechanism to show competency.

Whakawhanaungatanga: Inviting relational responsivity (2017) (Not in a refereed journal).This paper shows that the communitarianism of Māori culture is consistent with the emerging new 4E paradigm in cognitive science. An understanding is offered of the Three Baskets of Knowledge story also.

Inviting relational responsivity. (Not in refereed journal). 2017.-As we recognise our relational responsive nature we find a way of being with each other which does not position us counsellors as human engineers. The paper concludes that had we followed Tuke 200 years ago who wasn’t trying to manipulate his fellow quakers into change, unlike Pinel who was, we might be talking about ‘mental welfare’ rather than ‘mental health’ because we see that what has been lost touch with is our propensity to care for self and others.

Has the time come for Trigant Burrow? (Not in refereed journal) 2017. This paper reviews the thesis of Trigant Burrow, the first American psychoanalyst, who saw that our unity with each other and the world was our primary state of consciousness.

A mechanism for competency (not in refereed journal)-A review of the NZ HPCA Act, guild protection rackets, and an alternative mechanism for public protection.

Cultivating a Therapeutic Self-The literature on ‘expertise’, enactivism, and Foucault’s parrhēsia are reviewed to show a ‘no-self self’.

A taste of Wittgenstein for SFBT – 2. Journal of Solution Focused Brief Therapy, 1, 2: 41-58-This article is made available with the consent of the copyright holder, the Journal of Solution Focused Brief Therapy. An overview of Wittgenstein and the Philosophical Investigations for Solution Focused Brief therapists.

Risk, responsivity and responsibility in mental health: A Star wars story from Aotearoa (not in refereed journal)-Foucault and the ‘Star Wars’ motif are used to show the dark-side has taken over as risk-management processes reduce effectiveness.

‘Star Wars’ in mental health and welfare (not in refereed journal)-Flying under the flag of public protection risk management is doing harm and preventing Jedis from fighting the neoliberal empire.

A taste of Wittgenstein for SFBT – 1. Journal of Solution Focused Brief Therapy, 1,1: 11-29.-This article is made available with the consent of the copyright holder, the Journal of Solution Focused Brief Therapy. An overview of Wittgenstein and the Tractatus for Solution Focused Brief therapists.

Mental health is an ‘abominable mess’: Mind and nature a necessary unity. NZ Journal of Psychology, 43, 1: 5-17-This article is made available with the consent of the copyright holder, the NZ Journal of Psychology. A review of ‘real world’ outcomes in Mental Health.

Wittgenstein and the Red Queen: Attuning to the world and each other. NZ Journal of Psychology, 42, 3: 18-26.This article is made available with the consent of the copyright holder, the NZ Journal of Psychology.
Outcome feedback tools can assist both clients and therapists attune to Wittgenstein’s non-dualistic world.

Wittgenstein and the tikanga of psychotherapy. NZ Journal of Psychology, 40,2: 16-24.This article is made available with the consent of the copyright holder, the NZ Journal of Psychology. The non-dualistic world revealed by Wittgenstein’s Investigations can be witnessed in Māoritanga; we might take lessons.

Crisis engagement in mental health: A NZ Mäori contribution. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 17, 5: 317-325.This article is made available with the consent of the copyright holder, the International Journal of Mental Health Nursing. Co-authored with Te Ata Munro this paper advocates the priority of engagement over assessment in MH crises.

A pōwhiri poutama approach to therapy. N.Z. Journal of Counselling, 27, 1: 9-20.This article is made available with the consent of the copyright holder, the NZ Journal of Counselling.
The ritualistic steps taken on traversing a NZ Māori meeting house as a model of therapy.

The kaupapa outcome rating scale. NZ Journal of Counselling, 27, 1: 21-32.This article is made available with the consent of the copyright holder, the NZ Journal of Counselling. An outcome rating scale based on the NZ Māori whare tapa whā model of health.

The delicate scientist practitioner. Australian & New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy, 27, 4: 177-186.This article is made available with the consent of the copyright holder, the Australian & NZ Journal of Family Therapy.
A suggestion to adopt Goethe’s ‘delicate empiricism’ as an alternative to the Boulder model.

Three stories. Context: The Magazine for Family Therapy & Systemic Practice. December, 2003, 70: 2-6This article is made available with the consent of the copyright holder, Context. Three stories for telling in therapy for their therapeutic effect.

Amy and the fear monster-not in refereed journal.-A brief Narrative therapy story of 7year old Amy sorting out a fear monster.

From anorexia to model: Taking seriously a young woman’s goal” Family Therapy Case Studies, 7, 1: 29-32.-This article is made available with the consent of the copyright holder, the Family Therapy Case Studies. A case study on the dramatic success of a young woman wanting to be a model via a very simple intervention.

Anorexia tattoo. Presentation at the National Eating Disorders Meeting, Wellington. (Revised 1998)A 2-part case sudy utilising Narrative therapy & a purposively split team with a young woman first met in intensive care.

A strange encounter with Carl Auer: a story of pi. Not in refereed journal, Revised in 2014.-My first encounter with seeing the world from inside out rather than outside in.

 

In brief, a number of scholars read Wittgenstein as a form of zen for the Western intellect – where the goal is to achieve what in zen is called ‘the mind of no-mind’ – a state of absolute clarity and oneness with nature, where we move with nature in a seamless way. As it turns out we are already doing this a lot, or in zen, samsara (everyday mind) is nirvana (the enlightened mind); but recognising it allows us to cultivate it further. These papers will hopefully give psychotherapists in particular, but hopefully others as well, at least an introductory understanding of Wittgenstein’s thinking.

A taste of Wittgenstein for SFBT – 1. Journal of Solution Focused Brief Therapy, 2014, 1,1: 11-29.-This article is made available with the consent of the copyright holder, the Journal of Solution Focused Brief Therapy. An overview of Wittgenstein and the Tractatus for Solution Focused Brief therapists.

A taste of Wittgenstein for SFBT – 2. Journal of Solution Focused Brief Therapy, 2015, 1, 2: 41-58-This article is made available with the consent of the copyright holder, the Journal of Solution Focused Brief Therapy. An overview of Wittgenstein and the Philosophical Investigations for Solution Focused Brief therapists.

Wittgenstein and the tikanga of psychotherapy. NZ Journal of Psychology, 2011, 40,2: 16-24.This article is made available with the consent of the copyright holder, the NZ Journal of Psychology. The non-dualistic world revealed by Wittgenstein’s Investigations can be witnessed in Māoritanga; we might take lessons.

Wittgenstein and the Red Queen: Attuning to the world and each other. NZ Journal of Psychology, 42, 3: 18-26.This article is made available with the consent of the copyright holder, the NZ Journal of Psychology.
Outcome feedback tools can assist both clients and therapists attune to Wittgenstein’s non-dualistic world.

In brief Michel Foucault was a French historian of ideas, who showed how over the last millennium in particular, Europeans developed a way of thinking that positioned us as cartesian engineers (in some form or another) manipulating or leveraging the world for our advantage, which has led to the massive wealth disparities and ecological crises we now face. Mahayana Buddhism (which has inspired much of my thinking) is the great raft for getting everyone to enlightenment (clarity and oneness), and as such has a political focus. Foucault helps us understand the politics of various situations we find ourselves in, and helps us discern a path forward to return to a harmony with nature as a society.

‘Star Wars’ in mental health and welfare. (Not in referred journal). 2015.-Flying under the flag of public protection risk management is doing harm and preventing Jedis from fighting the neoliberal empire.

Risk, responsivity and responsibility in mental health: A Star wars story from Aotearoa. (Not in referred journal). 2016.-Foucault and the ‘Star Wars’ motif are used to show the dark-side has taken over as risk-management processes reduce effectiveness.

Psy phi’ is a slightly tongue-in-cheek term I use to identify a philosophy of science where the ‘being’ of the scientist is central. The scientist is no longer standing apart from the phenomenon she studies (as a cartesian) racking her brain for a hypothesis that fits; but rather finding a way of being at one with the phenomena and trusting her instincts will find useful expressions of the connections she senses. For the psychotherapist, the shift from Evidence Based Practice to Practice Based Evidence reflects this shift in thinking. Papers elsewhere on this site show this shift in terms of the move to 4E cognition (enactive, embodied, embedded, extended).

The delicate scientist practitioner. Australian & New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy, 27, 4: 177-186. 2006.This article is made available with the consent of the copyright holder, the Australian & NZ Journal of Family Therapy. A suggestion to adopt Goethe’s ‘delicate empiricism’ as an alternative to the Boulder model.

Has the time come for Trigant Burrow? (Not in refereed journal) 2017. This paper reviews the thesis of Trigant Burrow, the first American psychoanalyst, who saw that our unity with each other and the world was our primary state of consciousness.

A strange encounter with Carl Auer: a story of pi. Not in referred journal, Revised in 2014.-My first encounter with seeing the world from inside out rather than outside in.

Indigenous cultures in general, but NZ Māori in particular have ways of thinking and being that are far more attuned to nature, and Europeans have much to learn from them on ways of being and relating in the world and each other. It is not hard to see parallels between many of Wittgenstein’s observations and Foucault’s later work in Māori culture (see ‘Wittgenstein and the tikanga of psychotherapy’ above for example).

Whakawhanaungatanga: Inviting relational responsivity (2017) (Not in a refereed journal).This paper shows that the communitarianism of Māori culture is consistent with the emerging new 4E paradigm in cognitive science. An understanding is offered of the Three Baskets of Knowledge story also.

A pōwhiri poutama approach to therapy. N.Z. Journal of Counselling, 27, 1: 9-20. 2007.This article is made available with the consent of the copyright holder, the NZ Journal of Counselling. The ritualistic steps taken on traversing a NZ Māori meeting house as a model of therapy.

The kaupapa outcome rating scale. NZ Journal of Counselling, 27, 1: 21-32. 2007.This article is made available with the consent of the copyright holder, the NZ Journal of Counselling. An outcome rating scale based on the NZ Māori whare tapa whā model of health.

Crisis engagement in mental health: A NZ Mäori contribution. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 17, 5: 317-325. 2008.This article is made available with the consent of the copyright holder, the International Journal of Mental Health Nursing. Co-authored with Te Ata Munro this paper advocates the priority of engagement over assessment in MH crises.

As the observations of Wittgenstein, Foucault, and other 20th century luminaries permeates our consciousness we begin to see more clearly the current problems that are occurring in mental “health” and paths forward.

Mental health is an ‘abominable mess’: Mind and nature a necessary unity. NZ Journal of Psychology, 43, 1: 5-17, 2014.-This article is made available with the consent of the copyright holder, the NZ Journal of Psychology. A review of ‘real world’ outcomes in Mental Health, that suggests little or no improvements in 200 years.

Inviting relational responsivity. (Not in refereed journal). 2017.-As we recognise our relational responsive nature we find a way of being with each other which does not position us counsellors as human engineers. The paper concludes that had we followed Tuke 200 years ago who wasn’t trying to manipulate his fellow quakers into change, unlike Pinel who was, we might be talking about ‘mental welfare’ rather than ‘mental health’ because we see that what has been lost touch with is our propensity to care for self and others.

A mechanism for competence (Not in refereed journal) (2015)-A review of the NZ HPCA Act, guild protection rackets, and an alternative mechanism for public protection.

A competency mechanism. (Not in refereed journal). 2017.-A review of the NZ HPCA Act as it might concern NZ Counsellors, suggesting that they adopt routine outcome monitoring as a mechanism to show competency.

These papers show some of my approaches to psychotherapeutic issues over the years.

Notes for a workshop delivered at the Second Aotearoa Solution Focused Practice Conference, Christchurch, March 15th 2017

Anorexia tattoo. Presentation at the National Eating Disorders Meeting, Wellington. 1991. (Not in refereed journal. Revised 1998)A 2-part case study utilising Narrative therapy & a purposively split team with a young woman first met in intensive care.

Amy and the fear monster. (Not in refereed journal). (1992)-A brief Narrative therapy story of 7year old Amy sorting out a fear monster.

Three stories. Context: The Magazine for Family Therapy & Systemic Practice. December, 2003, 70: 2-6-This article is made available with the consent of the copyright holder, Context.
Three stories for telling in therapy for their therapeutic effect.

From anorexia to model: Taking seriously a young woman’s goal” Family Therapy Case Studies, 7, 1: 29-32. 1992.-This article is made available with the consent of the copyright holder, the Family Therapy Case Studies. A case study on the dramatic success of a young woman wanting to be a model via a very simple intervention.